Identity, Social Inclusion and Progression: a comparative study of Somalis migrating to the UK from Somalia and the Netherlands

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Identity, Social Inclusion and Progression: a comparative study of Somalis migrating to the UK from Somalia and the Netherlands

Type: Master thesis
Title: Identity, Social Inclusion and Progression: a comparative study of Somalis migrating to the UK from Somalia and the Netherlands
Author: Websdale, Asher
Issue Date: 2019-08-30
Keywords: Migration
Somalis
Somalia
United Kingdom
Social Capital
Social Inclusion
Social Progression
Identity
Secondary Movement
Interviews
Netherlands
Abstract: This study aimed to explore the differences in self-perceived identities, perceptions of social inclusion and perceptions of social progression of Somali-born migrants entering and residing in the UK. The study focuses on whether these differences exist depending on whether migrants arrive from the Netherlands, a Member State of the European Union (EU), or whether they arrive directly from Somalia, a nation outside of the EU. Literature concerned with Somalis residing in the UK, as well as specific literature focusing on Somalis leaving the Netherlands to migrate to the UK was used to contextualise the study. The research consisted of 18 face-to-face interviews carried in the UK: 10 interviews with individuals who arrived from Somalia and 8 with those that arrived from the Netherlands. Based on the data collected from these interviews, self-perceived identities between the two groups largely differ. Those arriving from the Netherlands typically disassociate from their Somali identity. Secondly, formulations of identity play a pivotal role in perceptions of social inclusion and social progression. On arrival those arriving from the Netherlands perceive themselves to be more socially included and have higher prospects of progressing in society. In terms of how these factors change over time, few conclusions could be drawn – though it appears that differences in country of arrival may become less important. Nevertheless, Somalis residing in the UK from both groups hold positive perceptions of how they are progressing in society.
Supervisor: Glynn, Irial
Faculty: Faculty of Humanities
Department: History (Master)
Specialisation: Governance of Migration and Diversity
ECTS Credits: 20
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/78062
 

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