Building ties across countries: International collaboration, field specialization, and global leadership

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Building ties across countries: International collaboration, field specialization, and global leadership

Type: Article in monograph or in proceedings
Title: Building ties across countries: International collaboration, field specialization, and global leadership
Author: Chinchilla-Rodríguez Z.Larivière V.Costas R.Robinson-García N.Sugimoto C.
Journal Title: STI 2018 Conference Proceedings
Start Page: 1509
End Page: 1518
Publisher: Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS)
Issue Date: 2018-09-11
Keywords: Scientometrics
Abstract: We analyze the role of leadership and scientific collaborative relationships in constituting the disciplinary specialization between countries and its research performance. Authorship order provides critical information for the allocation of reward, while collaboration enables researchers to expand the network of co-authors, institutions, and countries involved in the research. Along with these factors, a country’s profile orientation within the global scientific market become of great importance to the development of countries. As bibliographic data embedded such important information about the changes in the position of authors in the byline of publications and the disciplines involved in the research, we analyze these changes over time—using a Web of Science dataset—to explore the extent to which collaboration relationships impact leadership and specialization on the scientific workforce. Using this data, we discern the importance of domestic and international outputs in determining the disciplinary structure in scientific relationships in terms of publications and citations. We found that different types of leadership translate in different results in terms of relative specialization and citations. Overall results show that non-leading internationally collaborative papers reach higher values than leading international and domestic papers especially remarkable in terms of citations. Although in general, all regions increase their performance when collaborating with leading partners, the largest differences in research performance by leadership are located in countries with the lowest investment in R&D. Countries with the highest research investment are more likely to serve as leaders and garner higher specialization and citations when they lead (domestic and lead authorship). Comparative analyses of the role of specialization between countries can be useful for informing policies and motivating further collaboration relationships in the definitions of research agendas. 
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/65228
 

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