From development to developing: complexity science as applied to the political economy. Kenya's economic evolution within the New Silk Road.

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From development to developing: complexity science as applied to the political economy. Kenya's economic evolution within the New Silk Road.

Type: Master thesis
Title: From development to developing: complexity science as applied to the political economy. Kenya's economic evolution within the New Silk Road.
Author: Ligteringen, Merei
Issue Date: 2017-12-22
Keywords: complexity science
economic evolution
developing
Africa
co-evolution
interdependence
physical technologies
social technologies
economic strategy
New Silk Road (NSR)
Abstract: Contemporary development studies needs a 'processual shift' from development to developing in order to transcend the static problematisation of African underdevelopment. The Washington Consensus and the Beijing Consensus still approach African underdevelopment according to a teleological view that is rooted in the belief that economic growth is necessary for achieving prosperity. By applying complexity science to the economy, this research fills the lack within International Relations (IR) of critically revising African development in contemporary, changing contexts. A model of economic evolution is employed to conduct a transformative analysis of Kenya's developing within the twenty-first century New Silk Road (NSR). Utilising the process tracing method to examine combined data sets, the researcher explores manifestations of the interdependence between evolutionary technological, institutional, and strategic forces. The analysis provides an innovative account of how and why economic evolution has emerged in Kenya. Future research should refine the model, but not define it: evolution is an endless process from which the economy as a complex adaptive system emerges.
Description: Research line: "China's International Relations and Political Economy in the 21st Century: The New Silk Road."
Supervisor: Forough, Mahmad
Faculty: Faculty of Humanities
Department: International Relations (Master)
Specialisation: International Studies
ECTS Credits: 15
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/56721
 

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