Helminth infections and allergies in Ghana

Leiden Repository

Helminth infections and allergies in Ghana

Title: Helminth infections and allergies in Ghana
Author: Amoah, Abena Serwaa
Publisher: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine / Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden University
Issue Date: 2014-11-11
Keywords: Helminths
Africa
Urbanization
Allergies
Immunoglobin E,IgE crossreactivity
Food allergy
Gene expression
Cytokines
Immunoregulation
Abstract: Recent studies indicate that there is a global rise in the prevalence of asthma and other allergic disorders. Several epidemiological studies conducted in countries endemic for parasitic worms (helminths) have reported an inverse association between the presence of helminth infections and allergic disease. The main objectives of the study described in this thesis were to: i. To determine urban-rural differences in allergy outcomes in Ghana, West Africa ii. To examine the association between helminth infections and allergies iii. To characterize IgE responses associated with helminth infections and allergies The thesis describes cross-sectional studies among schoolchildren aged 5-16 years living in urban and rural areas of Southern Ghana. Study findings showed marked urban-rural differences in the prevalence of allergy outcomes with current infection with the waterborne helminth schistosoma being inversely associated with mite skin prick test allergic sensitization. In the study population, elevated levels of allergen specific IgE were observed that did not translate into skin reactivity or reported symptoms. Differences in gene expression profiles were also observed between urban and rural children. Overall, study findings indicate that factors associated with urbanization such as reduced exposure to parasitic worms are associated with the increased prevalence of allergy outcomes in Ghanaian children
Description: Promotores: M. Yazdanbakhsh, D.A. Boakye
With summary in Dutch
Faculty: LUMC
Citation: Amoah, A.S., 2014, Doctoral thesis, Leiden University
ISBN: 9789461825049
Sponsor: The investigations described in this thesis were financially supported by the Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research (WOTRO, grant no. WB 93-443), European Commission (grant no. FOOD-CT-2005-517812 and grant no. FOOD-CT-2005- 514000) and the Wellcome Trust (grant no. 075791/Z/04/Z).
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/29660
 

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