Cannabis use, cognitive functioning and behaviour problems

Leiden Repository

Cannabis use, cognitive functioning and behaviour problems

Type: Doctoral Thesis
Title: Cannabis use, cognitive functioning and behaviour problems
Author: Lendering, M.F.H.
Issue Date: 2013-03-28
Keywords: Cannabis use
Internalizing
Externalizing
Psychosis
Adolescence
Cognition
Emotion recognition
Inhibition
Impulsivity
Abstract: During early adolescence, there is no association between internalizing behaviour and cannabis use. There is an association between externalizing behaviour and cannabis use, where externalizing behaviour precedes cannabis use rather than the other way around. Secondly, during adolescence, there is an association between psychosis vulnerability and cannabis use, where cannabis use predicts psychosis vulnerability and vice versa, suggesting a bi-directional cascading association. Thirdly, during early adolescence, the social skill “self-control” was (unexpectedly) unrelated to cannabis use. Cooperation and assertiveness are associated with cannabis use during this life phase, where higher levels of cooperation decrease the chance of using cannabis and higher levels of assertiveness increase the chance of using cannabis during early adolescence. Cooperation and assertiveness did not differentiate between early and late onset of cannabis use or predict frequency of use. In addition, compared to non-users, cannabis users experience problems only in motivational inhibitory control, not in cognitive inhibitory control. Also, cannabis users experience problems in behavioural impulsivity, which is related to motivational inhibitory control. Lastly, cannabis users have problems with social perception in comparison to non-using controls, particularly when these social perception skills involve emotion recognition. Also, heavy cannabis users experience significantly more psychological problems when they have relatively poor social perception skills. Future research must determine whether the behavioural and cognitive concepts and constructs examined in this thesis in relation to cannabis use should be incorporated in prevention and intervention programs.
Promotor: Supervisor: Swaab-Barneveld H., Vollebergh W.A.M. Co-Supervisor: Huijbregts S.C.J.
Faculty: Social and Behavioural Sciences
University: Leiden University
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/20683
 

Files in this item

Description Size View
application/pdf Full Text 1.995Mb View/Open
application/pdf Cover 915.8Kb View/Open
application/pdf Title Pages_Contents 159.6Kb View/Open
application/pdf Chapter 1 278.4Kb View/Open
application/pdf Chapter 2 333.0Kb View/Open Full text at publisher site
application/pdf Chapter 3 362.2Kb View/Open Full text at publisher site
application/pdf Chapter 4 280.7Kb View/Open Full text at publisher site
application/pdf Chapter 5 478.1Kb View/Open Full text at publisher site
application/pdf Chapter 6 994.0Kb View/Open
application/pdf Chapter 7 210.1Kb View/Open
application/pdf References_Acknowledgements 204.6Kb View/Open
application/pdf Summary in Dutch 185.7Kb View/Open
application/pdf Summary in English 151.0Kb View/Open
application/pdf Curriculum Vitae_Note of Thanks 130.7Kb View/Open
application/pdf Propositions 116.3Kb View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)