Believing in the Net. Implicit religion and the internet hype, 1994-2001

Leiden Repository

Believing in the Net. Implicit religion and the internet hype, 1994-2001

Type: Doctoral thesis
Title: Believing in the Net. Implicit religion and the internet hype, 1994-2001
Author: Pärna, Karen
Publisher: Leiden University Institute for Religious Studies, Faculty of Humanities, Leiden University
Issue Date: 2010-01-28
Keywords: Sociology of religion
Implicit religion
Giving meaning
Disenchantment
Modernity
Anomie
Internet
ICT
Technophilia
Hypes
Abstract: Starting with Weber’s disenchantment thesis, a sociological tradition has developed that associates modernity with a crisis of meaning. The de-mystification of our worldview and the decreasing influence of religious traditions in specific are seen as obstacles for making sense of human existence. But in fact, modern societies are full of meaning and they continue to be religious. This study shows that, in an implicit form, religion can be found everywhere in our culture. The Internet hype of the 1990s was a particularly effervescent example of implicit religiosity. The hopeful discourse about the Internet that typified this hype drew on religious ideas and language, and it inspired strong belief. This dissertation explores the appeal of the Internet as an object of faith and it looks at how it could serve as a source of meaning.
Description: Promotor: M.B. ter Borg
With Summary in Dutch
Faculty: Faculty of Theology
Citation: Pärna, K., 2010, Doctoral Thesis, Leiden University
ISBN: 9789087280758
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/14622
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