African mutinies in the Netherlands East Indies: a nineteenth-century colonial paradox

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African mutinies in the Netherlands East Indies: a nineteenth-century colonial paradox

Type: Part of book or chapter of book
Title: African mutinies in the Netherlands East Indies: a nineteenth-century colonial paradox
Author: Kessel, W.M.J. van
Journal Title: African dynamics
Start Page: 141
End Page: 169
Pages: 29
Publisher: African Studies Centre
Issue Date: 2003
Keywords: Colonial armies
Ghana
Indonesia
Netherlands
rebellions
colonization
black soldiers
history
Netherlands
policy
violence
Abstract: Between 1831 and 1872, the Dutch government recruited 3,000 Africans from the Gold Coast and Ashanti (Ghana) for service in the colonial army in the Netherlands East Indies. The majority of them were ex-slaves but were promised that their conditions of service would be the same as those of Europeans. With the 'equal treatment' clause, the Dutch government defended itself against British accusations that the recruitment operation amounted to a covert form of slave trading. While this policy made sense in the context of the precolonial relations prevailing in the Gold Coast, its merits were less obvious in the East Indies. The colonial army here was the instrument of empire building but mutinies among African troops stationed on Java and Sumatra caused it to rethink its policy concerning African soldiers. This chapter explores the background to these rebellions. Ref., sum. [Book abstract]
Editor(s): Abbink, J.
Bruijn, M.E. de
Walraven, K. van
Uri: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/12877
urn:isbn:9004126244
Handle: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/12877
 

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